Photo
7 Steps to Publishing Your Novel.
Photo
A Very Complex Thing: The Battleground between James Baldwin and Norman Mailer

A Very Complex Thing: The Battleground between James Baldwin and Norman Mailer

Text

In terms of guidelines, we have none.

Writers, we are looking for work what documents life — yours, another’s, society’s — in a torrent of words that only your mind could sling together.

Submit.

Photo
If you’re a writer, particularly with an oft-unheard cultural perspective, consider submitting to us. http://www.thediverseartsproject.com/submit-to-the-journal/

If you’re a writer, particularly with an oft-unheard cultural perspective, consider submitting to us. http://www.thediverseartsproject.com/submit-to-the-journal/

Photo
"Why make art? Because life is so transitory. Days pass into nights in a blur. Things are bought, consumed and thrown away. Doing art is putting your personality— who you are at this very moment— and making something tangible out of it. Art is the greatest clue to the self. It draws from talent, experience, and the subconscious. But it must be drawn and that entails removing yourself from the outer world with its tweets and status updates and general distractions. It’s not easy to do. In fact, it can be like hitting your head against the wall. Because drawing out the ‘one and only you’ can be a challenge, as it’s easy to be influenced by others’ work. Some people meditate. I write stories and shoot photos. Really, in my mind it’s all the same thing— escaping the present world and entering a place deep within where you discover your inner truth." 
- DAP Interview with the well-traveled photographer and writer Sean Lotman.

"Why make art? Because life is so transitory. Days pass into nights in a blur. Things are bought, consumed and thrown away. Doing art is putting your personality— who you are at this very moment— and making something tangible out of it. Art is the greatest clue to the self. It draws from talent, experience, and the subconscious. But it must be drawn and that entails removing yourself from the outer world with its tweets and status updates and general distractions. It’s not easy to do. In fact, it can be like hitting your head against the wall. Because drawing out the ‘one and only you’ can be a challenge, as it’s easy to be influenced by others’ work. Some people meditate. I write stories and shoot photos. Really, in my mind it’s all the same thing— escaping the present world and entering a place deep within where you discover your inner truth." 

- DAP Interview with the well-traveled photographer and writer Sean Lotman.

Photo
Contribute an article to The Diverse Arts Project. Learn more here.

Contribute an article to The Diverse Arts Project. Learn more here.

Photo
billdixoncomedy:

Creative Writing And Masturbation
By Bill Dixon
I wouldn’t dare call myself an expert in creative writing. Although it’s something I do daily, it feels pretentious to apply a hierarchical model to the creation of art. Words like “expert” or “professional” seem silly when applied to something as arbitrary as creativity.
This is the classic writer’s cop-out, deputized at Thanksgiving when you return home from whichever metropolis you have chosen to sublet a closet-sized bedroom. Family and friends ask you how the “writing thing” is going and you regurgitate the prepared statement you concocted at the airport while scanning the never-ending parade of black luggage as it spilled onto the conveyor belt at baggage claim.
You’re a writer and you don’t write for The New York Times, The Daily Show, or Two and a Half Men, so you will need an excuse for not achieving the non-writing public’s apparent minimum requirement to be called a “real writer.”
“You know what show I like? That Breaking Bad!”, your functionally illiterate uncle declares. “That’s a good show. You should write for them.”
Thanks, Uncle Hasn’t-Paid-Child-Support-In-Three-Years. When I was digging through the couch cushions looking for change to buy bologna I must have totally spaced and forgot to call Bryan Cranston to let him know I’d put together a few episodes this season and that it would be best to just make the $22,000 check out to cash for accounting reasons.
But I can tell you with no trepidation that I am in fact an expert in masturbation. I mean that in the purest sense. I mean expert as in if there were masturbation murders, I could give expert testimony in the court of law. I mean expert as in Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 Hour Rule expert. It’s not a paying gig but to friends and family, on the scale of professional achievement, it’s probably on par with writing.
“At least it’s physical,” mom might say, “My son, the professional athlete.”
When you consider it, the similarities between masturbation and creative writing are uncanny: 
Both generally happen in front of a laptop with countless windows open on your desktop.
In both cases you become detached from reality while constructing complex narratives.
Both are difficult to do in public.
In both cases, it’s generally annoying to have someone peering over your shoulder looking at your “work” before it’s done.
Both emotionally and physically exhausting.
Both take way longer if you’re drunk.
Both are wildly dissatisfying if not finished.
Both are impossible to do with an iPad.
And most importantly:
Regardless of what your parents think, your friends think or the world thinks, you are going to do both until you are physically and mentally incapable of doing so any longer. Not because you’re stubborn and not because you are a fiend, but because your constitution will simply not permit you to stop. It’s in your DNA and it’s as natural as breathing.
Oh yeah:
And both are difficult to do while driving.

billdixoncomedy:

Creative Writing And Masturbation

By Bill Dixon

I wouldn’t dare call myself an expert in creative writing. Although it’s something I do daily, it feels pretentious to apply a hierarchical model to the creation of art. Words like “expert” or “professional” seem silly when applied to something as arbitrary as creativity.

This is the classic writer’s cop-out, deputized at Thanksgiving when you return home from whichever metropolis you have chosen to sublet a closet-sized bedroom. Family and friends ask you how the “writing thing” is going and you regurgitate the prepared statement you concocted at the airport while scanning the never-ending parade of black luggage as it spilled onto the conveyor belt at baggage claim.

You’re a writer and you don’t write for The New York Times, The Daily Show, or Two and a Half Men, so you will need an excuse for not achieving the non-writing public’s apparent minimum requirement to be called a “real writer.”

“You know what show I like? That Breaking Bad!”, your functionally illiterate uncle declares. “That’s a good show. You should write for them.”

Thanks, Uncle Hasn’t-Paid-Child-Support-In-Three-Years. When I was digging through the couch cushions looking for change to buy bologna I must have totally spaced and forgot to call Bryan Cranston to let him know I’d put together a few episodes this season and that it would be best to just make the $22,000 check out to cash for accounting reasons.

But I can tell you with no trepidation that I am in fact an expert in masturbation. I mean that in the purest sense. I mean expert as in if there were masturbation murders, I could give expert testimony in the court of law. I mean expert as in Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 Hour Rule expert. It’s not a paying gig but to friends and family, on the scale of professional achievement, it’s probably on par with writing.

“At least it’s physical,” mom might say, “My son, the professional athlete.”

When you consider it, the similarities between masturbation and creative writing are uncanny: 

  • Both generally happen in front of a laptop with countless windows open on your desktop.
  • In both cases you become detached from reality while constructing complex narratives.
  • Both are difficult to do in public.
  • In both cases, it’s generally annoying to have someone peering over your shoulder looking at your “work” before it’s done.
  • Both emotionally and physically exhausting.
  • Both take way longer if you’re drunk.
  • Both are wildly dissatisfying if not finished.
  • Both are impossible to do with an iPad.

And most importantly:

  • Regardless of what your parents think, your friends think or the world thinks, you are going to do both until you are physically and mentally incapable of doing so any longer. Not because you’re stubborn and not because you are a fiend, but because your constitution will simply not permit you to stop. It’s in your DNA and it’s as natural as breathing.

Oh yeah:

  • And both are difficult to do while driving.
Video

Check out our new homepage on Brooklyn Boheme, a documentary about a new york black arts community. 

Photo
The Fall 2011 DAP Journal.
Fiction, Poetry, Art, Music, Review.

The Fall 2011 DAP Journal.

Fiction, Poetry, Art, Music, Review.

Quote
"The two most engaging powers of an author are to make new things familiar, familiar things new."

William Makepeace Thackeray

Book Weirdo Blog

(via bookweirdo)

(via literarybinge)

Photo
vintageanchor:

“The artist doesn’t have time to listen to the critics. The ones who want to be writers read the reviews, the ones who want to write don’t have the time to read reviews.” — William Faulkner

vintageanchor:

“The artist doesn’t have time to listen to the critics. The ones who want to be writers read the reviews, the ones who want to write don’t have the time to read reviews.”
— William Faulkner

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)

Photo
icanread:

(by cryinglight)
Photoset

theamericandrama:

These handsome-looking things (books). Apparently, some people tell me, my children will view them as if they are some collector’s item. One of those future-predicting articles. 

Quote
"Let’s not let anyone tell us that the Internet is going to murder the book, because the automobile has yet to murder the bicycle. The book, like the bicycle, is a perfect invention, and perfection dies hard."

— William Giraldi, Poets & Writers July/August 2011 (via lesmotsjustes)

(Source: allhehearisbirds, via literarybinge)

Quote
"Without the public libraries, serious writers, unfashionable serious writers like me, really wouldn’t have a chance."

May Sarton (via theparisreview)

(via npr)